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I’ve recently been experimenting with a little-known tool called pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy. The technology shoots out bursts of electromagnetic fields to the body, affecting it right down to the cellular level. I’ve been reading about it for years and finally had a chance to experiment as of late.

The first time I used it was actually after I had an argument with my fiance. I was nearly red in the face with anger, steam practically coming out of my ears. My PEMF device had just come in the mail a few hours earlier, so I figured this was as great of a time than ever to put it through the ringer.

I placed the applicator near my chest, selected the 10 Hz. alpha program (for relaxation and calm), and hit the start button. Immediately I heard a clicking noise coming out of the device. I figured this must have been the pulses of electricity shooting the applicator.

Within 10 minutes or so, I felt noticeable effects. I felt strangly relaxed, as if I just drank a glass of wine. Tension in my neck and shoulders starting to loosen and the silly argument I had earlier didn’t seem quite as big of a deal anymore. Bad vibes be gone!

As the weeks went by, I started to experiment with PEMF in a myriad of ways – from meditating with it, using it to ease lower back pain, winding down with it before bed, and using it to energize in the morning. After my time with this PEMF device, I  look at the technology almost like a swiss-army knife, with the ability to optimize a wide variety of systems of the mind, body and spirit.

In terms of improving the mind, it can help to:

  • Lower stress and promote relaxation
  • Have deep, restful sleep
  • Treat anxiety, panic disorders and PTSD
  • Treat depression (especially treatment resistant depression)
  • Treat addiction

From a body perspective, it can help to:

  • Increase energy
  • Manage pain
  • Accelerate injury healing
  • Improve circulation
  • Accelerate bone healing
  • Enhance the immune system

In terms of spirit, PEMF can:

  • Sync you into deep, powerful meditations
  • Entrain your mind into mystical delta or theta brainwave states
  • Help tap into the natural electromagnetic frequency of the Earth
  • Hypercharge your biofield

To research the science and practice of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy, I’ve picked the brain of Dr. William Pawluk, one of the world’s leading authorities on the technology. In his book Power Tools For Health, he introduces PEMF through a great analogy from the physicist William Buchanan.

Imagine building a pile of sand on the beach. As you scoop handfuls of sand onto your ever-growing mountain, the pile gets larger and larger. At some point, you notice that new sand added to the top begins to avalanche down from the bottom, sometimes dismantling entire areas altogether. Why do the initial clumps of sand cause the mountain to grow, while the later clumps cause it to fall apart? Buchanan writes:

“To find out why [such unpredictability] should show up in their sand pile game, Bak and colleagues next played a trick with their computer. Imagine peering down on the pile from above, and coloring it in according to its steepness. Where it is relatively flat and stable, color it green; where steep and, in avalanche terms, “ready to go,” color it red. What do you see?

They found that at the outset the pile looked mostly green, but that, as the pile grew, the green became infiltrated with ever more red. With more grains, the scattering of red danger spots grew until a dense skeleton of instability ran through the pile. Here then was a clue to its peculiar behavior: a grain falling on a red spot can, by domino-like action, cause sliding at other nearby red spots. If the red network was sparse, and all trouble spots were well-isolated one from the other, then a single grain could have only limited repercussions.

But when the red spots come to riddle the pile, the consequences of the next grain become fiendishly unpredictable. It might trigger only a few tumblings, or it might instead set off a cataclysmic chain reaction involving millions. The sand pile seemed to have configured itself into a hypersensitive and peculiarly unstable condition in which the next falling grain could trigger a response of any size whatsoever.” 1

If you think of your body as this pile of sand, the goal is to prevent as many red spots as you can. I had a friend who recently threw out her back, making her bedridden for over a month. The cause? Simply reaching down for a coconut that fell onto the floor. A seemingly insignificant act lead to massive consequences, as the result of years of bad posture slowing created more and more red spots down her back.

According to Dr. Pawluk, PEMF is one of the best everyday tools we can use to reduce these red spots in our mind, body, and spirit. In his words:

“We use the term “power tools” to describe PEMF therapy because it both literally and metaphorically provides the energy we need to put all the pieces of our health together. PEMF devices treat the body on all levels. A PEMF system does not care what you perceive to be wrong with your body, and will provide stimulation to you whether you have a broken bone, failing heart, or struggle with anxiety. Magnetic stimulation treats at all levels—spiritual, physics processes, chemistry, and tissue. It treats with no regard to whether the disease state is energetic, physiologic, pathophysiologic, or pathologic. Magnetic therapy philosophy is holistic philosophy. By treating the entire person, it works to stabilize the entire sand pile.”

If PEMF is a power tool, then this is your user manual. We’re going to cover all things PEMF: from the history of magnetic therapy, to the science behind PEMF, to studies exploring its efficacy, to what PEMF devices to go with (including the device I personally use), and more.

The History of Magnetic Therapy

Although PEMF therapy is still relatively unknown in the western world, magnetic fields have been used in medicine for over 6,000 years with a rich history in ancient Greece, China, Japan, and Europe. 2

The ancient Vedic texts of India mention the use of the naturally occuring magnet lodestone to treat a number of diseases. The ancient Chinese used these same lodestones for thousands of years to remove blockages in the body’s Chi and restore its energetic balance. The Egyptian ruler Cleopatra used to wear a magnet stone on her forehead to maintain her beauty. The Greek philosopher Aristotle even spoke about the healing power of magnets.

In contemporary times, magnetic therapy starting to pick up steam after World War II beginning in Japan, eventually making its way to Eastern Europe where the initial wave of research came out of. Today, the use of magnets (specifically PEMF) are used by thousands of people around the world to treat a wide range of health conditions – from elite athletes looking to gain an edge over their competition, to chronic pain sufferers wanting to find alternatives to traditional pain medication, to even people like me who are using it to accelerate spiritual pursuits.

But where’s the science behind all this? There are thousands of years of history around the therapeutic use of magnets, but where’s the data? Keep reading down below to find out how PEMF’s work.

How Does PEMF work?

Everything around you is powered by electromagnetism – from the geomagnetic field of the Earth, to the magnetism of the sun spreading throughout our solar system.

Animals like foxes, lobsters, and birds literally have an inner compass, sensing the Earth’s magnetic field to better navigate throughout their environment. Ever wonder why your dog spins around in circles before pooping? Studies have shown dogs prefer to do their business in a north to south direction based on the Earth’s magnetism.3

The body can be be thought of as a literal electromagnetic battery. From the thoughts running through your mind, to the emotions you feel, to all your organs working to keep you alive and well, it’s all run by electromagnetism. When we zoom into our bodies at the cellular level, we find that each of our cells are mini conductors of electricity and emitters of magnetic fields.

The big idea behind PEMF, is that disease (whether mental, emotional, physical) is caused by electromagnetic deficiencies and imbalances in the body. Pulsed electromagnetic fields enhance and support our body’s biological systems. By doing so, these systems can run more efficiently, recover and repair better, and generally function more optimally.

But how you say? Before we move forward, let’s first cover a few foundational concepts around electromagnetism

Electromagnetism 101

Everything in the universe is made up of atoms. An atom is made up of a nucleus, neutrons (which have no charge), protons (which are positively charged), and electrons (which are negatively charged). The nucleus, neutrons and protons are in the center of the atom, while electrons hover around the nucleus.

Certain electrons (known as free electrons) can transfer from one atom to the next. If an atom gains electrons, it becomes negatively charged (known as a negative ion). If an atom loses electrons, it becomes positively charged (known as a positive ion).

Same charged ions repel each other, while oppositely charged ions are drawn towards each other.

Free electrons can transfer easily in certain types of material (known as conductors), such as silver, copper, and aluminum. Within a conductor, the flow of electrons from one atom to the next creates an electrical current.

When an electrical current is sent through a coil of wire, this generates a magnetic field. For example, if you were to coil a metal wire and place both ends on a battery, the object would suddenly behave like a magnet.

PEMF devices send pulses of electricity at specific frequencies through coils of wire. This in turn generates short bursts of magnetic fields out of the wire at that same rate. These pulses of magnetic fields penetrate straight through the body, affecting all the cells in its path.

How PEMF’s Recharge Our Cells

Our body contains trillions of cells, with thousands of biochemical processes going on in each one of them every second. These cells are run by electrical activity and magnetic fields.

If the body is run by electrical activity and magnetic fields, then it makes sense to treat the body with electrical activity and magnetic fields. Dr. Pawluk writes:

“To exist in an electromagnetic world, our bodies have to be an intimate part of it. The extraordinary amount of internal electrical activity that keeps our bodies alive naturally generates its own magnetic fields. Most people assume that this electrical activity is confined to the nervous system, but the vast majority of chemical reactions in the body are accompanied by the movement of charge. When you consider that most of the fluids in the body are actually electrolytes, it is easy to see that the body is like a large battery, producing current and occasionally needing recharging.”

If we think of each of our cell’s as a car, then ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is the gasoline that keeps it running. ATP is produced in a subsection of the cell called the Mitochondria. Studies have found that PEMF enhances mitochondrial function and ATP production. 4  5 6 PEMF also helps to release this stored energy. PEMF also helps the body recycle ATP, to eventually produce more.

Bottom line, cells that come into contact with a magnetic field literally become recharged and energized. It’s like plugging each of your cells into mini charging stations.

PEMF’s are particularly effective in healing damaged cells. Here’s a snippet of a recent interview I did with Dr. Pawluk discussing PEMF’s uncanny ability to repair damaged cells:

PEMF and The Mind

Brainwave Entrainment

PEMF has been shown to enhance brain function through brainwave entrainment. If you’re unfamiliar with this concept, it’s when one rhythmic system falls into synchrony with another rhythmic system. If you ever have seen schools of fishing swimming in synchrony, or frogs croaking together, or even people dancing to the beat of their favorite song, entrainment is occuring.

Entrainment can occur in the brain, when the electrical activity of neurons begin firing at the same rate of an external source. This could be induced by exposing oneself to pulsing audio or flashing lights (normally through audio visual entrainment devices). When PEMF is applied to the brain, it works in the same manner. Research has shown that PEMF therapy can entrain the brain to various target frequencies.

I can personally vouch for this. I’ve been using a PEMF device called the FlexPulse, placing the applicator on the top of my head at a 10 Hz alpha frequency (alpha is brainwave category that is linked with relaxation). Just like audio visual entrainment, I found myself naturally syncing into states of calm within minutes.

I’ve used its 7.83 theta frequency (theta is associated with REM sleep and deep states of meditation), and found myself syncing into a powerful meditation where the boundaries between myself and my environment began to slowly dissolve. I’ve also used the FlexPulse to targeta 3 Hz delta frequency (delta is linked with deep, dreamless sleep), and found myself snoozing within minutes.

If you can manage to stay awake during the Delta program, you can have some killer meditative experiences with it. Here’s Dr. Pawluk discussing his experiences meditating on 3 Hz:

The exciting thing with PEMF is unlike audio visual entrainment which only targets certain areas of the brain (i.e auditory and visual cortex), PEMF is able to penetrate the entire brain completely, stimulating all the cells in its system.

In fact, PEMF has been shown to regenerate nerve cells. It’s been shown to help heal neurological disorders such as concussion and traumatic brain injury (TBI), migraine, Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, stroke, and tremors.

Depression

Magnetic therapy has been shown particularly effective in treating depression. In fact, the FDA approved repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment for treatment-resistant depression, where patients have tried traditional solutions such as antidepressant medication but had no luck. rTMS is essentially the same thing has PEMF, but at much higher intensity levels (100x the power of consumer end devices like the FlexPulse that I use).

Why is magnetic therapy so effective in treating depression? Here’s Dr. Pawluk discussing

If you are suffering from depression and want practical tips to use PEMF to treat your condition, it’s beyond the scope of this article. However, I recently discussed this topic with Dr. Pawluk, take a listen:

Other Evidence Backed Benefits of PEMF

Although pulsed electromagnetic field therapy has yet to hit the mainstream, there has been over 2,000 double-blind studies done on its effectiveness. It’s been shown to help with the following conditions:

The list just mentioned was taken from the book Power Tools for Health. The book goes into much more detail explaining the studies done for all the mentioned health conditions.

How Safe is Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy?

Although the benefits you’ve just read may sound promising, you may be freaking out at the thought of exposing yourself to electromagnetic fields.

At the time of this writing, there are over 150 different products sold on Amazon designed to shield oneself from the harmful effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. Why would anyone in their right mind think deliberate exposure to these fields would be safe?

Fear not, there’s a major difference between therapeutic EMF versus the electromagnetic fields you’re exposed to in your environment. There are two types of unnatural electromagnetic fields you find in your environment that are unhealthy to expose oneself to.

The first harmful EMF is microwaves (a form of electromagnetic radiation with a shorter wavelength from one meter to one millimeter), which include radio signals, television signals, wifi, microwaves from cell phone towers, radar, etc. These higher frequency, shorter wavelengths of microwaves are measured around three feet and can disrupt the body’s chemical bonds, heating tissue and damaging cells in the process.

In comparison, the low frequency, higher wavelength PEMF systems you’ll come across carry far less energy. They have wavelengths anywhere from 6 to 60,000 miles long and pass through the body without heating or destroying tissue.

The second harmful EMF you have to watch out for is what many refer to as “dirty electricity” you get from power lines. Electricity coming out of these power lines are 60 Hz, and into the homes and buildings they are connected to. Electronic devices (televisions, computers, etc) feed these power systems higher frequency EMFs (much higher than 60 Hz), eventually making its way to the next home the power line is connected to.

Here’s Dr. Pawluk explaining unnatural EMF vs PEMF:

Another concern many have with PEMF is intensity levels of the various systems on the market. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that there is no evidence showing negative effects to humans exposed to magnetic fields up to two Tesla (or 20,000 gauss). MRI machines are some of the most intense PEMFs you’d be exposed to, which range from about 1.5 – 3 Teslas (15,000 – 30,000 gauss).

Most consumer end PEMF devices don’t produce intensities anywhere near MRI machines. For example, the PEMF device that I use and recommend is the FlexPulse, which has a maximum intensity of 0.02 Tesla (or 200 gauss). This is well below the WHO threshold level of safety, making it extremely safe to use.

Having said all this, PEMF isn’t for everyone, especially if you fall into any these categories:

  • Pregnant women
  • Those using a pacemaker
  • Those using an insulin pump

Like pacemakers or insulin pumps, I’d be extra cautious if you use any other type of implanted electrical device (defibrillators, cochlear implants, etc) as magnetic fields could shut these devices down.

Which PEMF device should you buy?

According to Dr. Pawluk, one of the biggest mistakes people make with PEMF is buying the wrong device. There’s a few things you should look for when buying a PEMF system.

Intensity

There are many PEMF devices on the market that are simply too weak to produce any substantial effect on the body. In Power Tools For Health, Dr. Pawluk categorizes device intensity by the following:

  • Extremely low: less than 0.5 gauss
  • Low: 0.5 guess – 10 gauss
  • Medium: 10 gauss – 100 gauss
  • High: 100 – 1,000 gauss
  • Very High: Greater than 1,000 gauss

There are some devices on the market that are sold for tens of thousands of dollars that only produce 1 gauss. You’re better of simply placing your bare feet on the Earth, as the Earth’s natural magnetic field is roughly 0.5 gauss.

Generally speaking, the more intense the issue you’re trying to treat with PEMF, the higher intensity you’re going to need. A relatively healthy person simply wanting to use PEMF to have a boost in energy won’t need anywhere the same amount of strength someone who’s looking to treat treatment-resistant depression.

Frequency

If you’re going to invest in a PEMF system, chances are you’re going to want to use it for a number of different applications – whether that’s for deep healing, relaxation, increased energy, managing your mental health, etc.

This is especially true if you’re going to be sharing a PEMF device with others like a spouse or other family members. An important feature to look for is to find a system that gives you a few different options for target frequencies.

Other Factors To Consider

There’s a few other factors you want to make sure your PEMF manufacturer offers before you pull the trigger on a system. Do they offer a money back guarantee? How is their customer reviews? Do they offer support helping you to get started with the system? Is the device portable or is it so heavy it has to stay at your house?

PEMF devices aren’t cheap and could play a massive role in your health, so you want to make sure the manufacturer offers these essentials.

My Recommended PEMF Device: The Flexpulse

Hands down my recommended PEMF device is the Flexpulse made by a the German manufacturer Pierenkemper GmbH.

My favorite pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) device, the FlexPulse

There’s a few reasons I love this device. It has a maximum intensity of 200 gauss, so it has plenty of power to move the needle for most types of health needs. It comes with 6 target frequencies to choose from:

  • 3 Hz (this is the slowest frequency included in the device which is perfect to help get to sleep, and stay asleep throughout the night)
  • 7.8 Hz (this is the Schumann resonance or the natural electromagnetic frequency of the planet, which is great for relaxation, meditation, and winding down before bed)
  • 10 Hz (great for relaxation, stress reduction, meditation, tissue and cell regeneration, pain management and stabilizing circadian rhythms)
  • 23 Hz (excellent if you want to improve mental function, alertness, attentiveness)
  • 100 Hz (the Flexpulse has a program that alternates between 10hz and 100hz every minute, which targets most of the muscles of the body and is great for accelerated recovery)
  • 1,000 Hz (research has shown this frequency is effective in treating acute depression)

Unlike other PEMF devices, it’s lightweight, small (fits in the palm of my hand), and portable. Whether you’re sitting at home, on a flight, or at the office, you can have the device by your side. It’s battery powered, so you don’t have to worry about plugging it into an outlet (another reason for its portability).
It comes with 2 separate applicators (allowing you to target multiple areas of your body at once).

FlexPulse are actually offering readers of Warrior.do a 15% discount on the their device. Just use the coupon code WARRIOR at checkout to redeem your discount (this will save you $193 off the cost of the device).  🙂 Wahoo!

How To Enhance Results With PEMF

To place your body in the most optimal state to receive PEMF’s, Dr. Pawluk gives two recommendations.

The first is to make sure you’re properly topped up with your minerals (calcium, sodium, magnesium, potassium). Calcium and magnesium are of particular importance when it comes to PEMF. Most of the actions of magnetic fields act through the calcium / magnesium ion channels. Without proper levels of either of these minerals, PEMF won’t work as well.

Staying hydrated is also crucial when dealing with PEMF’s. Electromagnetic energy moves best through water. Just another reason to drink your eight glasses of water per day.

Conclusion

Pulsed electromagnetic therapy (PEMF) is one of the best all around tools to optimize the body and mind that I’ve covered on Warrior.do.

This swiss army knife like tool can optimize your health in a myriad of ways from a cellular level – whether you want to dive into deeper meditations, ease pain, accelerate recovery, supercharge your energy, and more. If you have the money to invest in a quality device like the FlexPulse, I couldn’t recommend it more.

Recommended Reading:

References:

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